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Jack O'Connor mentions

Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Mon Jun 12, 2017 2:26 pm

The July/August 2017 RIFLESHOOTER magazine contains a two page article ".270 Jack" by Craig Boddington describing JO'C's famous use and writing about the .270 as well as other calibers he owned and hunted with.
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Thu Jun 29, 2017 1:21 pm

From the July/August 2017 SPORTS AFIELD magazine article "Something Special" (John Barsness):

"A good example would be my Winchester Model 70 Featherweight.270 acquired during a fundraising auction at the Jack O'Connor Hunting Heritage and Education Center in Lewiston, Idaho. The 75th anniversary of the introduction of the Model 70 was celebrated by special runs of two grades of O'Connor Tribute rifles. Mine, of course, is the lesser grade (otherwise I couldn't have afforded the auction) but it's still a very nice looking rifle.
After I got back to Montana, it wasn't long before the rifle made a trip to the range. Its very first group at 100 yards measured 0.40 inch. Not every group has been that small, of course, but the rifle shoots so accurately it's moved all my other .270s down the road, and often gets used to test-fire new components.
I also hunt with this rifle, something that's shocked a few people. One guy insisted, "you don't hunt with a rifle like that," a statement I suspect would offend Jack O'Connor.
In fact, part of the reason I kept bidding on the rifle was hearing from several other Tribute owners about how well their rifles shot."
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Sun Jul 02, 2017 6:31 pm

From the August 2017 SHOOTING TIMES magazine article "A Survivor's Story" (Allan Jones):

"Thanks to superb performance and Jack O'Connor, the .270 Win. remains a great choice for North American sportsmen.
TOP NOTCH PERFORMANCE and a FAMOUS ADVOCATE KEEP IT ALIVE
Perhaps the best overview of the early acceptance problems the .270 Win. faced resides in one of my favorite Jack O'Connor books, The Hunting Rifle (1970). In chapter 6 he wrote, "When the .270 appeared back in 1925, it didn't set the world afire...." He went on to ruminate on some of the issues it faced, including the transition of American hunters from lever-action to bolt-action rifles. O'Connor researched old gun publications of the time for The Hunting Rifle book and found a pattern of disdain and lack of interest. One well known writer condemned the .270 without ever firing it. Another prolific cartridge reviewer simply never wrote about it. A popular shooting magazine that had the highest U.S. circulation did not publish anything about the .270 Win. until three years after its introduction.
In spite of a slow start, the .270 Win. not only survived but also became one of our most popular sporting cartridges. Top notch performance made it work, but the .270 had another advantage that no other cartridge enjoyed: a constant advocate who kept the cartridge in the consumers' minds for almost a half-century. When someone thought about buying a new rifle, the .270 Win. had Jack O'Connor behind it.
O'Connor used the .270 almost from its inception, but he did not start writing hunting and shooting articles until the mid-1930s. I see his praise not so much as evangelical zeal but rather straight facts based on an impeccable database of experience. It didn't hurt that his position with Outdoor Life and his body of work in books gave him the "bully pulpit" to reach the great mass of sportsmen."
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:41 pm

From the August 2017 GUNS&AMMO magazine article "The Lefty & Old Betsy" (about Warren Page):

"Page's opposite number at Outdoor Life was Jack O'Connor. Unlike the fierce rivalry between O'Connor and Guns&Ammo's Elmer Keith, Page and O'Connor were friendly competitors with large followings. O'Connor championed the .270, while Page was known as a 7mm advocate.
In 1958, Page became the third winner of the Weatherby Big Game Trophy, following Herb Klein and Jack O'Connor. Page did not do as much mountain hunting as O'Connor, but he had considerably more international experience. Page inspired millions of readers, every bit as much as O'Connor. Page was 67 when he died in January 1977."
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Fri Aug 04, 2017 2:05 pm

From the September/October 2017 RIFLE SHOOTER magazine article "The Fantastic 5" (Craig Boddington):

7x57 Mauser (1892)
"Although Jack O'Connor is best known as the champion of the .270, he was also a staunch fan of the 7x57, as was his wife, Eleanor. Most of Jack's desert rams were taken with a 7x57, and Eleanor rarely hunted with anything else."

.30-06 (1906)
"Eleanor O'Connor, the 7x57 fan, considered the .30-06 heavy artillery. That's what she used for her largest game, including her only elephant, which she brained with a 220-grain solid."

.270 Win. (1925)
"No other gun writer has achieved the reach of Jack O'Connor, so the fact the .270 was so often featured in his writing didn't hurt it. O'Connor had a .270 in 1925, but it really wasn't until after World War II that it became a clear favorite. By then it was well established and it remains popular 40 years after O'Connor's death. So to my thinking, he gets much credit for the .270's popularity--but some must come from the cartridge's own merits.
I had a .270 back in the 1970s and used it for my first whitetail and my first black bear, but as a young writer in O'Connor's shadow, I stayed away from it for many years. Today I have to concede that Professor O'Connor was pretty much right: The .270 Win. is an awesome cartridge for the mountain hunting he loved--and for a whole lot more."

.257 Roberts (1934)
"I don't expect to take it sheep hunting, as O'Connor did, but it remains ideal for deer and pronghorns at medium range--as it has been since long before it became a factory cartridge."
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:02 pm

From the October 2017 SHOOTING TIMES magazine article "The Keys to a Good Hunting Rifle" (Terry Wieland):

"Al Biesen, Jack O'Connor's "genius of Spokane," was a custom gunmaker who aspired to make perfect hunting rifles. Not works of art or glitzy artifacts to sit in a glass case--real hunting rifles."
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:05 pm

From the October 2017 GUNS magazine article "Longevity - Some Cartridges Have It and Some Don't" (Dave Anderson):

"Many times I've read the .270 Win is popular only because it was a favorite of Jack O'Connor. Jack was influential, more than any writer since, but he's been gone for almost 40 years. And even in the O'Connor era, the .270 got as much bad press as good, from writers who hated the cartridge (or more likely, hated O'Connor)."
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:10 pm

From the Fall Classic Hunting Issue 2017 SPORTS AFIELD article "With Rifle and Packhorse" (John Barsness):

"But the writer who really turned the Rocky Mountain pack trip into a dream for most hunters was Jack O'Connor. Born in Arizona in 1902, he eventually became an English and journalism professor at what's today Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. Like Whelen, he wrote on the side, but far more widely, including short stories for major magazines and two novels. But income from fiction was erratic, and with a wife and four kids to support during the Depression, O'Connor eventually concentrated on writing hunting and gun articles, eventually landing a column at Outdoor Life.
In 1943 the magazine paid for O'Connor to go on a month-long pack trip in Northern Alberta, resulting in bighorn sheep, mountain goat, caribou, moose and grizzly. The next year he made a pack trip in Wyoming for bighorn, elk, and moose, and in 1945 went to the Yukon, hunting some of the same country traveled by the Young party in 1919.
O'Connor made his longest pack trip into the Prophet-Muskwa country of British Columbia. The hunt lasted forty-five days, much of it spent just riding from and back to the then-new Alaska Highway.
But O'Connor also witnessed the end of the Golden Age. His posthumously published THE LAST BOOK, which finally appeared in 1984, included a comparison of his initial 1943 Alberta pack trip with another made in the same area in 1961. In 1943 O'Connor "saw thirty-three grizzlies in in thirty days. In 1961 we saw none. In 1943 we saw hundreds of caribou. In 1961 we saw one. In 1943 we saw about a dozen bull moose. In 1961 we saw one. In 1943 we saw about 300 ewes, lambs and young rams and 35 old trophy rams. In 1961 we saw half a dozen rams. In 1943 we saw literally thousands of goats...In 1961 we saw no more than a dozen..."
On a later hunt in northern British Columbia, O'Connor, a companion, and their guide were planning a stalk on a very big Stone ram when a helicopter from a prospecting company hovered low over the ram, running it of, before landing. One later pack-string hunt was run by a ripoff outfitter who didn't provide competent camp help, or enough food or horses. Two people had to walk rather than ride and O'Connor and his companion ended up shooting two young caribou simply to have something to eat.
Jack O'Connor wrote "the pack is the best way to see game, to know the country, and get the feel of it, and to have a real rest and change." Even today, when two weeks is a long hunt, his words still contain enough truth to keep hunters packing into the Rocky Mountains."

[pic]
Jack O'Connor probably caused more hunters to start dreaming of a Rocky Mountain pack trip than any other writer.
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Arctosman » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:27 pm

Go Hogs,

Thanks for keeping this JOC Forum alive with your posts.

I read a few outdoor, shooting and hunting magazines myself and I also see constant references to Jack O'Connor even after all these years since he left us. Some of my favorite current outdoor/shooting writers, Craig Boddington, John Barsness and Wayne VanZwoll still reference Jack in their writings. You've referenced them all in your posts here in this forum.

I believe all contemporary outdoor/shooting writers stand on Jack's giant shoulders.
Blued steel & walnut,
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Re: Jack O'Connor mentions

Postby Go Hogs » Sun Sep 24, 2017 6:41 pm

Arctosman wrote:Go Hogs,

Thanks for keeping this JOC Forum alive with your posts.

I read a few outdoor, shooting and hunting magazines myself and I also see constant references to Jack O'Connor even after all these years since he left us. Some of my favorite current outdoor/shooting writers, Craig Boddington, John Barsness and Wayne VanZwoll still reference Jack in their writings. You've referenced them all in your posts here in this forum.

I believe all contemporary outdoor/shooting writers stand on Jack's giant shoulders.

Arctosman:
Thanks for the kind words.
It IS amazing that after so many years, Jack O'Connor's writings, advice, hunts and opinions are still held in such high regard that they appear so regularly in the sporting and shooting magazines. His ability to craft the written word was without peer, and matched with his wit and expertise - well, we were fortunate indeed to have him.
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